Connect with us

Men's Health

Consuming nuts each day may improve men’s sexual function

Published

on

Men taking part in a clinical trial who added two handfuls of nuts a day to their regular diet reported sexual function improvements.

New research suggests eating 60 g of nuts every day can enhance sexual function for people.

The 14-week study compared a group of men who applied to a Western-style diet a daily dose of certain nuts with an equal group of men who eat the same diet but without nuts.

The daily dose of nuts consisted of 60 grams (g) of almonds, hazelnuts, and walnuts— the equivalent of about two handfuls.

The researchers, who come from Spain’s research centres, say this is the first study to show that eating nuts can support sexual function.

In a paper published in the journal Nutrients, they report their findings.

A 2018 review of the trial data had already confirmed that the routine use of these nuts tended to improve the quality of the semen.

The recent analysis uses the same trial data but focuses on the impact on sexual and erectile function of nut intake.

Project Results suggest that adding nuts to a Western-style diet can improve the quality of orgasm and sexual desire.

For evaluating changes in erectile function, the researchers used two data sources: participant responses to questionnaires and biomarkers in blood samples.

Erectile dysfunction and risk factors

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the failure to get an erection and hold it long enough to have sexual intercourse which is satisfactory. The disease has a greater chance of affecting older men than younger men.

ED is widespread in the United States, where it affects about 30 million people, according to the National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, which is one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The authors note that the results on primary prevention are largely preliminary, although there has been improvement in ED study.

Smoking, insufficient physical activity, stress, consuming too much alcohol, carrying too much weight and having an unhealthy diet are factors that can increase the risk for ED.

Such factors can affect erectile function through its effects on blood vessel and nerve biology. An adequate blood supply is needed for getting and maintaining an erection.

An erection is based on a complex interaction between the blood vessels and nerve cells. The process also involves the presence of nitric oxide (NO), a compound which helps to produce muscle tissue in the penis and to relieve an erection.

The effect of diet

Several studies have linked the Mediterranean diet to a reduced risk of ED and sexual dysfunction, as well as diets that share some of its features.

These studies have related these diets to endothelial function improvements. The endothelium in blood vessel walls helps maintain an equilibrium between dilation and contraction. The authors highlight research findings suggesting endothelial function can benefit from eating nuts.

I also refer to a recent study that showed that eating pistachios could improve the function of erectiles. We say this might be because, like other nuts, pistachios contain “several antioxidants and arginine, a precursor to[ NO], a potent compound that enhances vasodilatation.”

The new study data came from 83 healthy males between the ages of 18 and 35. All men followed a Western-style diet that is low in fruits and vegetables and high in animal fats, unlike the Mediterranean diet.

The researchers randomly assigned to the nut-enriched group 43 of the men and to the control group the remaining 40. All groups practiced their diet in Western style. Nevertheless, those in the nut-enriched group also ate 60 g of mixed nuts a day, while members of the control group did not add nuts to their diet.

Self-report and biomarker measures

At both the start and the end of the 14-week experiment, the participants filled out a standard questionnaire about erectile and sexual function. In those days, they even gave samples of blood and sperm. In the tests, the researchers measured the NO levels and the E-selectin molecule as “surrogated indicators of erectile endothelial function.”

Compared to those in the control group, participants who added nuts to their diet showed significant increases in two erectile and sexual functional measures: orgasmic function and sexual desire.

There were however no significant differences between the two groups in how much the ratings on erectile function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction had improved by the end of the study.

Furthermore, the levels before and after of the two erectile endothelial function markers— NO and E-selectin — did not differ significantly between the two groups.

In conclusion the authors conclude:

“Including nuts significantly improved self-reported orgasmic function and sexual desire in a regular diet.”

They call for further, large-scale studies to confirm their findings and discover the mechanisms which explain why eating nuts could benefit sexual function.

A grant from the International Council for Nut and Dried Fruit has helped finance the research.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

thirteen − 2 =

Men's Health

Penis pain: What are the causes?

Published

on

Penis pain can be caused by a variety of factors and can range from minor to severe. This discomfort can strike at any time of day or night, during sexual activity, or when peeing. People may also experience discomfort in various locations of the penis or different types of pain, such as intense, dull, throbbing, or shooting pain.

While penile pain can occasionally be relieved at home, some underlying causes may necessitate medical attention. If a person has any concerns, they should seek medical advice.

This article goes through some of the possible reasons of penile pain, as well as the associated symptoms and treatment options.

Peyronie’s disease

penis pain

Peyronie’s disease is a condition in which plaque occurs on the top or bottom of the penis due to scar tissue. Peyronie’s disease has no known origin, but experts believe it is caused by scarring of the penis. This scarring could be caused by an autoimmune disease or a severe or repetitive penis injury.

Peyronie’s disease can cause the following symptoms:

  • lumps on the side of the penis
  • the penis becoming narrower or shorter than usual
  • erectile dysfunction or pain during an erection
  • pain during sex
  • a curve in the penis

If you detect any of these symptoms, you should consult a doctor. Peyronie’s disease can go away without therapy in certain cases, and if the curvature is not severe, treatment may not be required. Other people with the condition, on the other hand, may require:

If a person’s symptoms are severe and do not improve, surgery may be required.

Priapism

A prolonged and often painful erection that is not related to sexual activity is referred to as priapism. It happens when blood in the penis becomes stuck and unable to drain, causing tissue injury or destruction. The reason of some occurrences is uncertain. Priapism, on the other hand, can be caused by a variety of diseases or medications. Possible triggers include, for example:

  • prescription medication, such as blood thinners or erectile dysfunction treatments
  • recreational drugs or alcohol use
  • blood conditions, such as sickle cell anemia
  • trauma to the genitals or spinal cord

Priapism is a significant medical problem, and patients should seek medical attention if they experience a prolonged, painful erection that lasts more than 4 hours without stimulation.  To relieve an erection, a person can attempt peeing, taking a warm bath, drinking water, or doing light exercise. The following medical therapies may be used:

  • aspiration, which involves using a surgical needle to drain excess blood
  • creating a small hole or passage, called a shunt, to allow for adequate blood flow between the penis and the rest of the body
  • pain medications
  • injecting medication into the penis to allow for sufficient blood circulation

Penile fracture

A penile fracture occurs when the erect penis bends, usually as a result of force, causing a portion of it to tear. There are no bones in the penis, hence it isn’t really a fracture. According to some studies, penile fractures are most likely to develop during sexual activity.

The following are signs and symptoms of a penile fracture:

  • bleeding from the penis
  • blood in the urine
  • pain
  • difficulty urinating
  • a popping sound
  • sudden loss of erection
  • bruising and swelling of the penis

A penile fracture necessitates immediate medical treatment. They may also require surgery to remove any blood buildup and repair any damage to the penis.

Balanitis

When the head of the penis gets inflamed, it is referred to as balanitis. The glans penis (or glans penis) is a portion of the penis that affects 3–11 percent of men. This irritation can occur in those who have not been circumcised, especially if the area behind the foreskin is not adequately washed and dried.

Balanitis can also be caused by the following factors:

Other causes of balanitis can include:

  • sexually transmitted infections
  • diabetes
  • using strong soap or chemicals on the penis

Symptoms of balanitis may include:

  • swelling
  • itching
  • a rash
  • discharge
  • tenderness or pain
  • phimosis, or tight foreskin

Treatment options for balanitis can include:

  • a topical astringent solution
  • topical steroids
  • topical antibiotic, antifungal, or antiseptic ointment

Phimosis

When the foreskin tightens to the point where it is impossible to pull back, phimosis occurs. Before the foreskin loosens, it is frequent in young children, but it can also cause unpleasant symptoms in teenagers and adults.

Phimosis is commonly treated by putting a steroid cream to the foreskin on a daily basis. Taking pain medicines may also assist, and a doctor may recommend circumcision in some circumstances.

Paraphimosis

Paraphimosis is a disorder in which persons are unable to move the foreskin forward over the tip of the penis, comparable to phimosis. It’s a critical condition that has to be treated right now.

Additional signs and symptoms include:

  • the head of the penis turning a different color, such as blue or red
  • swelling in the tip of the penis
  • pain in the penis

Paraphimosis is treated by lowering the swelling at the tip of the penis so that the foreskin can return to its proper place. If doctors are unable to achieve this, a tiny incision may be made to minimize swelling. Circumcision may be required in specific instances.

Sexually transmitted infections

Due to a sexually transmitted infection (STI), people may have pain in the penis. This word refers to illnesses that can occur as a result of sexual activity or close physical contact.

An STI can cause a person to have no symptoms at all. Individuals with a penis, on the other hand, may have the following symptoms:

  • burning or itching sensation, such as when urinating
  • pain around the pelvis
  • frequent urination
  • painful ejaculation
  • discharge from the penis
  • sores, lumps, or blisters around the genitals

STI treatments differ based on the underlying cause. Antibiotics for bacterial STIs like chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis, or antivirals to treat the symptoms of viral STIs like herpes, for example.

Urinary tract infections

A urinary tract infection (UTI) can occur when bacteria invade the urinary tract. Females are more likely to be affected, however males might still be affected. These infections are fairly prevalent in general, with some evidence indicating that they are the second most common type of infection in the body.

Males may experience the following symptoms in addition to penile pain:

  • a frequent urge to urinate
  • blood in the urine
  • pain or a burning sensation when urinating
  • feeling the need to urinate when the bladder is empty

To treat a UTI, a doctor will typically prescribe antibiotics.

  • injury
  • reaction to spermicides or contraceptive lotions
  • bacteria
  • viruses

Symptoms may include:

  • an itchy, tender, or swollen penis
  • a frequent urge to urinate
  • burning sensation when urinating
  • discharge
  • pain during sex or ejaculation

To treat urethritis, a doctor will usually prescribe antibiotics.

Prostatitis

Prostatitis is a frequent prostate disease in which the prostate is inflamed. This might cause discomfort in the penis and pelvis. Prostatitis can be caused by bacterial infections, nerve inflammation, or trauma.

The following are some of the symptoms of the condition:

  • pain in the penis, testicles, or bladder
  • painful ejaculation
  • pain or burning when urinating
  • blood in the urine

Treatment will vary depending on a person’s symptoms and the cause of inflammation, however antibiotics are usually prescribed. Medications for pain alleviation, prostate massage, and hot compresses might also assist to alleviate discomfort.

Penile cancer

Penile pain can occasionally be a sign of penile cancer, but it’s more likely to be the consequence of something else. If somebody notices any of the following symptoms, they should consult their doctor:

  • bleeding or discharge under the foreskin
  • swelling at the head of the penis
  • lumps under the skin in the groin area
  • a rash on the penis
  • changes to the color or thickness of the skin of the penis
  • a lump or crusty bumps on the penis
  • bleeding ulcers

Treatment for penile cancer may include:

  • chemotherapy
  • immunotherapy
  • surgery to remove tumors in the penis
  • circumcision to remove the foreskin
  • radiation therapy to destroy cancer cells

Conclusion

Penis pain can be caused by a variety of factors. By addressing a person’s other symptoms, a doctor can assist in determining the origin of the pain.

People can also reduce their chances of getting a penile health problem by:

  • using a condom during sex
  • keeping good personal hygiene
  • maintaining a healthy lifestyle

If a person has continuous or severe penile pain, he or she should consult a doctor.

Sources:

  • https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/balanitis
  • https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/balanitis/
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459233/
  • https://www.nhs.uk/common-health-questions/mens-health/is-it-normal-to-have-a-curved-penis/
  • https://www.cancer.org/cancer/penile-cancer.html
  • https://www.cancer.gov/types/penile/patient/penile-treatment-pdq
  • https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324608
  • https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324608
  • https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/penile-curvature-peyronies-disease
  • https://urology.ucsf.edu/patient-care/children/phimosis#.YcCn12r7Rb8
  • https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=phimosis-and-paraphimosis-90-P03104
  • https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/priapism-painful-erections/
  • https://www.pcf.org/about-prostate-cancer/what-is-prostate-cancer/prostate-gland/prostatitis/
  • https://www.urologyhealth.org/urology-a-z/p/prostatitis-(infection-of-the-prostate)
  • https://medlineplus.gov/sexuallytransmitteddiseases.html
  • https://www.cdc.gov/std/general/default.htm
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459178/
  • https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/phimosis/
  • https://bestpractice.bmj.com/topics/en-gb/54

Continue Reading

Endocrinology

What are the signs and symptoms of a high estrogen level?

Published

on

Estrogen is a sex hormone that is crucial to the body’s functioning. Abnormal levels can have a wide range of consequences for one’s health. High estrogen levels, for example, can lead to weight gain, depression, and severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in women.

Males have estrogen as well, although in much lesser levels. It might be difficult to get an erection if your estrogen levels are higher than they should be.

Estrogen levels increase and fall naturally to some extent, but if they remain continuously high, more significant issues might arise. Estrogen dominance occurs when estrogen levels in females are higher than progesterone levels.

Continue reading to discover more about the signs and symptoms of high estrogen levels, as well as the causes.

Gender and sex exist on a spectrum. This article will use the terms “male,” “female,” or both to refer to the sex assigned at birth. To learn more, visit here.

Estrogen

a worried lady
Guille Faingold/Stocksy

Estrogen is an important hormone for both male and female sexual development and health.

Estrogen impacts mood, controls cholesterol levels, and supports bone health. This hormone affects puberty, the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and menopause in women.

Estrogen is divided into three types:

  • Estradiol: This is the most powerful type of estrogen, and it is found in the highest quantity in women of reproductive age. This kind of estrogen is used by doctors to assess the health of the ovaries.
  • Estrone: In males, this is the most common kind of estrogen. After menopause, it is also the predominant type of estrogen in females. Estrone is produced by the ovaries, placenta, testicles, and adipose tissue by androstenedione or androgens.
  • Estriol: This kind of estrogen is produced by the placenta and increases during pregnancy. As the fetus grows, the quantity of estriol produced rises.

Estrogen levels can impact various parts of the body, including the reproductive system, skin, hair, bones, muscles, brain, and breast tissue, whether they rise or fall. Because everyone has some breast tissue, fluctuations can also have these consequences in men.

Causes

Estrogen levels might become too high for a variety of causes. They may rise as a result of the following factors:

  • changes in how the body excretes estrogen
  • changes in how the body breaks estrogen down
  • an overproduction of estrogen

Any of the aforementioned factors might result in a hormonal imbalance. Estrogen dominance occurs in females when estrogen levels are high relative to progesterone levels, which is one of the other important female sex hormones.

Estrogen dominance can be caused by a variety of circumstances, including:

  • Stress: Cortisol levels rise as a result of stress. When cortisol levels are regularly high, this hormone can deplete progesterone levels, which can lead to estrogen imbalances.
  • Medications: Some drugs might increase estrogen levels while decreasing progesterone levels.
  • Health conditions: Estrogen dominance is linked to or caused by a number of health issues. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), uterine fibroids, endometriosis, and certain cancers are among them. Insulin resistance raises estrogen levels as well.
  • Alcohol consumption: Excessive alcohol use elevates estradiol levels and makes it more difficult for the body to digest estrogen.
  • Obesity: Because adipose tissue creates estrone, having a greater body weight can result in increased levels of estrogen.
  • Dysbiosis: Intestinal dysbiosis occurs when a person’s large intestine has too many dangerous bacteria species or not enough helpful bacteria species. Some forms of gut bacteria can impair the body’s ability to eliminate excess estrogen, resulting in greater amounts in the body.
  • Xenoestrogen exposure: If these compounds enter the body, they act like estrogen. Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, which are found in certain plastics, are two examples. Some personal care items, such as soaps and shampoos, include phthalates.

If testosterone levels fall below a certain threshold, estrogen levels in guys might become too high in relation to the quantity of testosterone in the body.

Symptoms

Males and females are affected differently by high estrogen levels.

Females

Excess estrogen in females can result in:

  • fatigue
  • fibroids in the uterus
  • fibrocystic lumps in the breasts
  • low sex drive
  • low mood or anxiety
  • weight gain, especially around the hips and waist
  • heavy or light periods
  • worse PMS than usual

Other signs and symptoms to consider are:

Males

Too much estrogen in males can lead to:

  • infertility
  • difficulty getting or maintaining an erection
  • enlarged breasts, known as gynecomastia

According to a 2018 study high estrogen levels are also associated with increased rates of depression in males.

Complications

A person’s chance of developing breast cancer increases if their estrogen levels are continuously high over a lengthy period of time.

  • hypocalcemia, which is low calcium
  • breast cancer
  • cervical cancer
  • high blood pressure
  • blood clots

High estrogen levels can exacerbate pre-existing conditions like asthma or epilepsy.

In a 2017 study in South Korea, researchers discovered a link between high levels of free estriol and a higher risk of gestational diabetes during pregnancy.

Diagnosis

Diagnostic testing may not be necessary to prove that the estrogen ratio is out of balance in females who display indications of estrogen dominance. This is because many of the estrogen-reduction suggestions that doctors may offer are typically favorable to overall health and unlikely to cause damage.

If high estrogen levels are caused by an underlying medical condition, a doctor may order testing to identify whether there is an imbalance and confirm the main cause. Estriol levels are also monitored in high-risk pregnancies by doctors.

Doctors can test for all three kinds of estrogen in females using blood tests. Only estradiol and estrone are measured in men.

Treatment

Treatment for high estrogen levels is determined on the underlying cause. Doctors may propose lifestyle adjustments to lessen estrogen dominance that is not caused by a specific medical condition. People can attempt the following:

  • reducing stress
  • limiting or stopping alcohol consumption
  • avoiding xenoestrogens, such as BPA in plastics
  • avoiding any natural or herbal remedies that may increase estrogen
  • eating an anti-inflammatory or vegetarian diet
  • eating more soy, flaxseed, and cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and kale
  • getting more omega-3 fatty acids in the diet or taking a supplement
  • maintaining a moderate weight

If a drug or supplement causes high estrogen, a person should talk to their doctor about other options. It’s important to never adjust a medication’s dose or stop taking it without first visiting a doctor.

If a person has high estrogen levels and a doctor feels it is important to reduce them — maybe to avert long-term harm to the body — aromatase inhibitors may be prescribed. Aromatase is an enzyme that aids in the conversion of androgens to estrogen in the body.

To inhibit the signal that begins estrogen production in the ovaries, doctors may give a synthetic type of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH). If estrogen is worsening a potentially life-threatening condition, such as metastatic breast cancer, they may suggest LHRH.

Conclusion

In females, high estrogen levels can induce irregular or heavy periods, weight gain, exhaustion, and fibroids. They can induce breast tissue development, infertility, and difficulties achieving or keeping an erection in men.

By collecting a medical history and, in certain situations, doing blood tests, a doctor can detect high estrogen levels. The doctor will be able to propose the best therapy choices after they have determined the problem. The therapy choices will be determined by the reason of the high estrogen levels.

Changes in lifestyle and nutrition may lower the amount of estrogen produced by the body or increase the amount it breaks down and excretes. Anyone with chronic or troubling symptoms, on the other hand, should seek medical advice.

Sources:

  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538260/
  • https://labtestsonline.org/tests/estrogens
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5332840/
  • https://www.va.gov/WHOLEHEALTHLIBRARY/tools/estrogen-dominance.asp
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29107881
  • https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323280

Continue Reading

Men's Health

10 interesting facts about the penis

Published

on

Although many people who have a penis are familiar with its antics, this appendage is more than meets the eye. In this article, we’ll go over ten interesting details about the penis that you probably didn’t know.

statue of man

When seen as an evolutionary adaptation, the penis has performed admirably.

The penis has a long history. In case you’re curious, the oldest known penis is 425 million years old, and it came from an arthropod called Colymbosathon ecplecticos, which means “amazing swimmer with a large penis” in Greek.

Anyone who is amazed at how quickly the penis can be “activated” should consider its importance to our species’ existence. In terms of reproduction, a false arousal is preferable to a missed opportunity.

“Even the world’s greatest actor cannot fake an erection,” author Mokokoma Mokhonoana famously said. This brings us to the day’s first penile fact.

1. The first erection

Penises are born ready, and it is typical for babies to have an erection when they leave the womb. Ultrasound scans can sometimes reveal a fetus with a fully formed erection even before birth.

Fetal erections are most likely during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, according to a 1991 study. And they can occur several times per hour. Nobody knows why, but it could be the body’s way of ensuring that everything is in working order.

2. A penis is twice as long as you think

Many people may find comfort in the fact that their penises are longer than they appear. In fact, the body contains almost half of the total length.

An internal view of the male genitalia
An internal view of the male genitalia

“Well, it’s no good to me up there,” you might think, but it needs to be connected to the rest of the anatomy, so it’s probably best if it stays place.

The mass of pink erectile tissue — which includes the so-called “corpus cavernosum” and “corpus spongiosum” — reaches well into the pelvic region, generating a boomerang shape, as seen in the diagram above.

3. The shoe size myth

Let’s lay this one to rest, shall we? There is no link between shoe size and penis length, according to a 2002 study published in the journal BJU International.

Although a previous study from 1993 indicated a modest association between penile length and both height and foot length, the authors concluded that “height and foot size would not serve as realistic estimators of penis length.”

Other relationships were investigated in a 2006 study published in the International Journal of Impotence Research. “Penile dimensions are substantially linked with age, height, and index finger length,” the researchers concluded, but not with foot size.

4. ‘Morning wood’

The majority of people with penises get 3–5 erections per night, most of which occur during REM sleep. This is also known as “nocturnal penile tumescence,” and the cause is unknown.

An erection reduces urination, which could help avoid bed wetting, according to one theory.

A full bladder has been shown to stimulate nerves in the same area as those responsible for erections. However, because people with vaginas have a condition called nocturnal clitoral tumescence, bed wetting prevention is unlikely to be the complete solution.

Another possibility is that REM sleep is linked to the switching off of noradrenaline-producing cells in the brainstem’s locus coeruleus. The tone of the penis is inhibited by these cells. As a result of the reduction of inhibition, the penis grows erect.

Nocturnal erections, for whatever reason, can be beneficial as a diagnostic tool. If it’s difficult to get or keep an erection when awake but not while sleeping, it could be due to a psychological issue rather than a physical one.

5. One final erection

So, we’ve shown that erections may occur in the womb and while sleeping, but the death erection is possibly even more startling. It’s also known as “angel lust” or a terminal erection, and it occurs shortly after death.

It is most typically found in people who have died by hanging, and scientists believe it is caused by pressure from the noose on the cerebellum.

It has also been reported in the aftermath of a gunshot wound to the head, significant blood vessel damage, and poisoning.

Another theory is that “brutal destruction of the cervical spinal cord” causes the erection.

6. The penis can break

The absence of a bone in the penis is unusual among mammals. The penis, on the other hand, can still be broken. This is most common during forceful sex, but it has also been reported by doctors in people who have fallen out of bed with an erection.

The rupture of the fibrous covering of the corpora cavernosa, which is the tissue that grows erect when engorged with blood, is known as a penile fracture.

A popping or cracking sound, acute pain, swelling, and — unexpectedly — flaccidity accompany the fracture.

Thankfully, it doesn’t happen very often, and if treated quickly, complete function can be restored. If this happens to you, take care not to let your shame get the best of you. Consult a physician as soon as possible.

The most “dangerous” position, according to the authors of a study that looked at 42 cases of penile fracture, was “woman on top.”

7. No-brainer

The majority of people with penises have little control over when they ejaculate. This is partly due to the fact that it does not require the utilization of the brain. The spinal ejaculation generator sends the signal to ejaculate. The required functions are coordinated in this region of the spinal cord.

Of course, the brain has some involvement on these matters — thinking about something else, for example, is a well-known strategy to delay an event — but the spine handles the nuts and bolts of the entire procedure.

8. The angle of the dangle

A penile erection can be directed in almost any direction. There is no right or wrong in going straight forward, left or right, up or down.

The information below comes from a study that looked at 1,484 erections.

The measurement was 0 degrees if the penis was oriented directly up, and 90 degrees if it was pointed forward (horizontal) in the figures below:

  • 0–30 degrees: 4.9% of participants
  • 30–60 degrees: 29.6% of participants
  • 60–85 degrees: 30.9% of participants
  • 85–95 degrees: 9.9% of participants
  • 95–120 degrees: 19.8% of participants
  • 120–180 degrees 4.9% of participants

So, if you’re worried that your partner is a little off, don’t be.

While we’re on the subject of “normality,” it’s worth noting that few penises are perfectly straight; they can curve in any way. It is still deemed healthy to have a curvature of up to 30 degrees.

9. Grower or show-er

There is no association between the length of a flaccid penis and its erect size, according to a study with 274 participants. Some are little while flaccid and only grow a little when erect (a grower), while others are enormous when flaccid and only grow a little when erect (a show-er).

Some are little regardless of arousal, while others are large while flaccid and grow to be larger. It’s a mixed bag.

This may or may not be useful outside of the locker room, but it’s always good to know.

10. Cornflakes prevent masturbation

They truly don’t. However, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, the breakfast cereal mastermind, hoped that they would. He created cornflakes and other items in the hopes of luring Americans away from the “sin” of masturbating through plain foods.

Thankfully, food makers no longer spend as much time attempting to persuade teenagers to stop masturbating. It also doesn’t render you blind, just in case there was any doubt.

If this list has piqued your interest, you should consider planning a vacation to Iceland to see the Icelandic Phallological Museum, which is dedicated to all things penile. Sigurur Hjartarson, whose interest in the subject began when he was given a bull’s penis as a child, founded the museum.

According to Hjartarson: “Collecting penises is like collecting anything. You can never stop, you can never catch up, you can always get a new one, a better one.”

If you want to take things a step further, head to Beijing’s Guolizhuang Restaurant, which serves penis and testicle dishes. It’s entirely up to you.

Continue Reading

Copyright © 2022 NccMed.com