Is magnesium effective in the treatment of migraines?

Migraines are difficult to treat with standard medicine, so many people seek out other methods to prevent them. Magnesium is one possible treatment.

Magnesium is a naturally occurring mineral that aids in blood pressure control, heart health, neuron and muscle function regulation, and the formation of bone, DNA, and protein. Headaches and migraines may be caused by a magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium is used by some people to treat and prevent migraine symptoms such as severe migraines, visual abnormalities, sensitivity to light and sound, nausea, and vomiting.

Magnesium and migraines

magnesium

Taking a magnesium supplement, according to some study, may be an effective method to prevent headaches. Other research has revealed that during a migraine, a person’s brain magnesium levels may be low.

To avoid migraines, the American Migraine Foundation recommends taking a 400–500 mg magnesium oxide supplement daily.

Magnesium’s effectiveness as a migraine preventive, according to some researchers, increases when a person takes higher dosages — over 600 (mg) — for at least 3 to 4 months.

Taking high dosages of magnesium as a supplement, on the other hand, may cause side effects in some people.

For people with migraines that include an aura or visual abnormalities, using magnesium may be more beneficial.

How to Treat Migraines with Magnesium

Magnesium oxide, in the form of a tablet, can be taken by migraine people to enhance their magnesium intake.

If a person is having trouble absorbing magnesium sulfate, a doctor may inject 1–2 grams (g) of it intravenously.

Magnesium can also be found in the following forms:

  • magnesium citrate
  • magnesium chloride
  • magnesium carbonate

The body absorbs these different types of magnesium at different rates. Magnesium is difficult to absorb unless it is bonded to something else, thus magnesium supplements frequently include other nutrients, such as amino acids, that have additional health advantages.

Some people prefer to increase their magnesium intake by eating more.

Magnesium can be found in the following foods:

  • mackerel, tuna, and Pollock
  • low-fat yogurt or kefir
  • bananas
  • figs
  • dark chocolate
  • cereals
  • spices
  • cocoa
  • nuts and grains
  • black beans and lentils
  • tea and coffee
  • green leafy vegetables
  • avocado
  • seeds, such as pumpkin or squash seeds
  • almonds

Magnesium is suggested in daily doses of 310–320 mg for women and 400–420 mg for males.

Risks and side effects

Magnesium is found in a variety of foods. There appear to be no hazards connected with increasing magnesium levels by consuming more of these foods.

Taking too many magnesium supplements, on the other hand, might cause unpleasant side effects such as diarrhea, cramping, and vomiting.

If a person develops diarrhea as a result of taking a magnesium supplement, they should stop using it immediately. Staying hydrated is also critical for a person suffering from diarrhea.

People should also avoid taking magnesium supplements if they are using aminoglycoside antibiotics. Combining these medications can cause in muscular weakness and other issues.

Magnesium can also interfere with how antibiotics are absorbed. As a result, any essential antibiotics should be taken at least 2 hours before or 4 to 6 hours after taking these supplements.

Magnesium also helps to reduce blood pressure. People who take magnesium supplements while taking blood pressure medicine may be at risk for hypotension, which is when blood pressure drops dangerously low.

An overabundance of magnesium in the body can have serious consequences, including:

  • coma
  • slowed breathing
  • an irregular heartbeat

Supplementing of magnesium may cause additional negative effects in people who have specific medical conditions, such as:

  • kidney problems, including kidney failure
  • gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or a stomach infection
  • bleeding disorders
  • diabetes

Anyone considering taking magnesium supplements should consult with a physician first. A doctor can tell you if the supplement is safe for you depending on your medical history.

Before using a magnesium supplement, pregnant women should visit their doctor. They should also avoid taking high amounts of magnesium sulfate intravenously because it can cause bone thinning in the fetus.

Conclusion

Magnesium, if administered correctly, could be a safe therapeutic choice for migraine people. Its risk of negative side effects is lower than that of some established medical therapies.

Magnesium oxide may be especially beneficial for people who have a history of aura.

Magnesium supplements should be discussed with a doctor first, as they may combine with a person’s medication or exacerbate symptoms of an existing condition.

Magnesium supplements can be found in a variety of pharmacies and health food stores.

Sources:

  • http://nccam.nih.gov/health/pain/headachefacts.htm?nav=gsa
  • http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/minerals/magnesium
  • https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-Consumer/
  • https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322596
  • http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/
  • http://dining.nd.edu/whats-happening/news/69490-magnesiumthe-invisible-deficiency/
  • https://www.migrainetrust.org/living-with-migraine/treatments/supplements-and-herbs/
  • https://americanmigrainefoundation.org/understanding-migraine/magnesium/
  • https://www.migrainetrust.org/about-migraine/types-of-migraine/

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