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GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology

What prebiotic foods should people eat?

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Prebiotics are natural fibers and sugars which stimulate the good bacteria in the gut. Many prebiotic foods are ideal for eating vegans and humans on other diets. Such products include almonds, chicory, chickpeas and garlic.

Prebiotics assist in the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut. They work to improve health with probiotics, that are healthy bacteria or yeasts. To date, most work has concentrated on probiotics around gut health, with prebiotics being a fairly recent focus field.

Further work is needed to discover all of the prebiotics’ health benefits, but they are likely to be a valuable dietary component.

Many of the most well-known prebiotic sources are ideal for vegans. This article discusses 19 of those foods, including vegetables , legumes, fruits, nuts , and seeds.

Vegetables

Vegetables with a high prebiotic content include:

1. Chicory

Chicory root is high in inulin, a prebiotic fiber which makes it a rich prebiotic source.

The root of chicory also improves digestion, has antioxidant properties and can relieve constipation.

2. Jerusalem artichokes

Jerusalem artichokes
Jerusalem artichokes are a source of fiber and prebiotics.

Artichokes are fibre-high and carbohydrate-low.

You have a low Glycemic Index ( GI), which helps to maintain stable levels of blood sugar.

Artichokes in Jerusalem contain around 1.6 grams ( g) of dietary fiber per 100 g.

Eating this fibrous vegetable will make the amount of good bacteria in the gut increase.

3. Garlic

Garlic is another source of prebiotics which promotes the growth of beneficial gut bacteria and prevents the multiplication of harmful bacteria.

Garlic is a healthy food that should be included in your diet. In 100 g of garlic, there are:

  • 1.235 milligrams (mg) of vitamin B-6
  • 2.1 g of fiber

4. Onions, shallots, and spring onions

Onions, shallots and spring-onions all belong to the same vegetable family.

Besides being a good source of prebiotics, these foods also aid digestion, activate beneficial gut bacteria and have antioxidant properties

5. Leeks

Leeks are another member of the onion family that can help people boost their prebiotic intake.

They contain 1.8 g of fiber in every 100 g.

6. Savoy cabbage

Savoy cabbage contains vitamins B and C, and is an excellent source of prebiotics that occur naturally, making it healthy for the gut.

Raw savoy cabbage has a fiber content of 3.1 g per 100 g.

Legumes

Legumes are the fruits or seeds of plants from a specific family. Legumes with a high prebiotic content include:

7. Chickpeas

Chickpeas are a good food choice for people looking to increase their prebiotic intake.

They contain 12.2 g of fiber per 100 g.

Chickpeas are also rich in protein, iron, and B vitamins.

8. Lentils

Pink or red lentils are filling, easy to digest, and very healthful.

They are a rich source of fiber, containing 10.8 g per 100 g, and help stimulate beneficial bacteria as well as aid digestion.

9. Red kidney beans, baked beans, and soybeans

Red kidney beans are easy to include in a range of meals.
Red kidney beans are easy to include in a range of meals.

Beans are another kind of food which can improve healthy bacteria in the gut.

Beans are rich in protein, and are an excellent potassium source.

The beans’ nutritious value makes them a perfect staple food they need to consume daily.

Such legumes are also fibre-rich. For example , red kidney beans contain 15.2 g of fibre per 100 g.

Fruits

Fruits with a high prebiotic content include:

10. Bananas

Bananas are beneficial for the gut and contain natural fibers which help to increase good bacteria and reduce bloating.

They offer 2.6 g of fiber per 100 g.

11. Custard apples

Custard apples have antioxidant properties that make them beneficial to the health of the heart and brain, which can help minimize cholesterol.

A prebiotic properties come from a naturally occurring fiber, which fills a person’s gut with the right bacteria and helps fend off the bad bacteria.

12. Watermelon

Watermelon is another fruit which contains prebiotics and which can feed the good bacteria in the stomach of a individual. The watermelon content is high and this fruit is also perfect for hydration.

13. Grapefruit

Citrusy grapefruit is another great choice for vegans looking to consume prebiotic foods. Grapefruit’s high fiber content makes it good for the health of the gut, and is also rich in vitamins A and C.

Cereal grains

Several cereal grains also have a high prebiotic content, including:

14. Bran

Bran contains fiber that feeds beneficial gut bacteria.

Bran also promotes regular bowel movements and may reduce cholesterol.

15. Barley

Barley is an immune-boosting, antioxidant powerhouse and an excellent source of prebiotic fiber.

Raw barley contains 15.6 g of fiber per 100 g.

16. Oats

Oats are a good alternative for vegans due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, because they provide a variety of health benefits.

Raw oats contain 15.4 g of fiber per 100 g.

Nuts and seeds

Nuts and seeds with a high prebiotic content include:

17. Almonds

Almonds are popular as a healthful snack food.
Almonds are popular as a healthful snack food.

Almonds are rich in dietary fiber, and a strong prebiotic source.

They produce 12.5 g per 100 g of fiber.

Almonds can add texture and flavor to a variety of hot and cold dishes

Almonds are also a good source of calcium for vegans, in addition to their fiber content.

18. Pistachio nuts

Pistachio nuts contain high amounts of protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals from vegetables. They are an excellent source of vegan prebiotics and can help to promote healthy bacteria in the gut.

19. Flaxseeds

Flaxseeds are a flexible seed which can be used in several dishes.

These contain large quantities of fiber that help sustain well being in the gut and keep the digestive system working smooth.

Takeaway

People who wish to boost their prebiotic intake can do so by:

  • eating high-fiber breakfast cereals with added nuts and seeds
  • eating whole-grain bread
  • snacking on fruits, nuts, and seeds
  • adding legumes to soups and salads
  • reading food labels and selecting products with a high fiber content

Many prebiotic foods are ideal for vegans and people adopting other diets, allowing them to consume a varied, balanced diet that also encourages good health in the gut.Many prebiotic foods are suitable for vegans and people following other diets, making it possible for them to eat a varied, healthful diet that also promotes good gut health.

Colorectal Cancer

Descending colon: What you need to know

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The descending colon is a part of the large intestine. The colon’s left side is the one that descends. It is in charge of keeping the leftovers of digested food until they are eliminated through the rest of the colon and rectum.

The large intestine is involved in nutrient absorption. It also prepares the body’s waste products for removal.

The colon is the section of the large intestine that is the longest. Water and salt are absorbed, and liquid waste is solidified into stool. The ascending, transverse, descending, and sigmoid colons are the four primary parts.

Ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn’s disease, and colorectal cancer are just a few of the disorders that can impact the function of this section of the digestive tract.

We’ll look at the structure of the descending colon, as well as its function and the disorders that can affect it, in this article.

What is it?

Descending colon

The colon is the largest and longest part of the large intestine, and it is divided into four sections:

  • the sigmoid colon
  • the ascending colon
  • the descending colon
  • the transverse colon

The big intestine is a component of the gastrointestinal tract that connects to the small intestine on one end and the anus on the other.

The descending colon connects the transverse colon to the sigmoid colon and is the third primary portion. It begins from the splenic flexure, or bend, and finishes at the sigmoid colon’s junction. It’s called a retroperitoneal organ because it’s located behind the peritoneum. The peritoneum is the tissue that covers most of the abdominal organs and borders the abdominal wall.

The descending colon measures 10–15 cm in length. It’s in the abdomen’s left lumbar area. This area is located in the middle of the abdomen to the left. In this area, the descending colon runs in front of and down the left kidney.

Function

The descending colon’s major function is to store hardened stool that will eventually empty into the rectum and be removed from the body.

The teniae coli, or smooth muscle bands, produce a series of pouches, or haustra, in all four sections of the colon. The colon appears segmented as a result of this.

The gastrocolic reflex is activated when the colon fills with digested food, causing peristalsis, which is a sequence of wave-like muscular contractions that assist move food along the digestive tract. Food can now pass from the descending colon to the rectum.

The colon’s overall function includes:

  • forming and moving stool forward into the rectum for removal
  • producing and absorbing vitamins
  • absorbing water and electrolytes

Conditions

The function of the descending colon and the colon as a whole may be affected by certain disorders. They may have an effect on the colon’s ability to absorb nutrients and create stool.

The following are some of the most prevalent descending colon health issues:

Crohn’s disease

Another chronic inflammatory disease is Crohn’s disease. It’s an autoimmune condition that can affect any region of the digestive tract, including the colon, from the mouth to the anus.

The skin, joints, bones, eyes, kidneys, and liver are all affected, though the digestive system is the most common. Furthermore, it causes intestinal ulcers, which cause discomfort and pain.

Experts are unsure what causes Crohn’s disease, but they believe it is caused by an aberrant immunological response. Other factors, like as genetics and the environment, could also be at play.

Irritable bowel disease (IBD) includes both UC and Crohn’s disease.

Colonic perforation

A colonic or bowel perforation is a type of gastrointestinal perforation that occurs in the colon.

A cut, tear, or puncture in the colon’s wall can be caused by an injury, but it can also be caused by infection, obstruction, or inflammation.

A colonic perforation causes significant abdominal pain and often necessitates emergency surgery, which may include the removal of a portion of the intestines.

UC

UC is an inflammatory condition that lasts for a long time. It is caused by immune system abnormalities that cause inflammation in the colon.

Ulcers form in the lining of the colon lining as a result of UC. This might cause in stool pain and the urge to stool regularly.

Experts are unsure of the actual cause of UC, however it could be caused by a condition of variables, including:

Colorectal cancer

Cancer that begins in the colon or rectum is known as colorectal cancer. This happens when cancer cells in the colon start to grow out of control.

Colorectal cancers typically begin as polyps on the inner lining of the colon. However, not all polyps become cancerous, and the likelihood of a polyp becoming cancerous varies depending on the type of tumor present.

The size and location of tumors, whether the cancer is recurring, and a person’s overall health will all influence treatment. Among the possibilities are:

Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis is a condition in which small pouches or sacs called diverticula form and push outward through weak areas in the colon wall, causing inflammation.

These protrusions may not always be problematic, but when they get inflamed, they can cause symptoms like:

They can also cause problems including perforation and bleeding.

The following treatments may be used:

  • using antibiotics
  • in some cases, undergoing surgery
  • increasing one’s dietary fiber intake
  • taking pain relief medication

Tips for a healthy colon

People should eat a well-balanced diet, drink lots of water, and exercise regularly to maintain a healthy colon.

The American Cancer Society provides the following colon health recommendations to help minimize the risk of colorectal cancer:

  • reducing consumption of red and processed meats
  • reaching or maintaining a moderate body weight
  • limiting or avoiding alcohol consumption
  • having a diet that is rich in vegetables, fruit, and whole grains
  • quitting smoking
  • exercising
  • increasing dietary fiber intake

Conclusion

The big intestine includes the descending colon. It joins the transverse and sigmoid colon and is used to hold stool before it is emptied into the rectum.

The colon as a whole is responsible for absorbing nutrients from the diet as well as producing and releasing wastes.

IBD, colonic perforation, and diverticulitis are just a few of the health problems that can affect colon function.

Making healthy lifestyle choices, such as eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly, and limiting or avoiding processed meats and alcohol, can help to preserve intestinal health.

Sources:

  • https://training.seer.cancer.gov/colorectal/anatomy/
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK507857/
  • https://www.cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer.html
  • https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK537224/
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK470577/
  • https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/descending-colon
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK549888/
  • https://www.crohnscolitisfoundation.org/what-is-crohns-disease/overview
  • https://www.crohnscolitisfoundation.org/what-is-ulcerative-colitis/overview
  • https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/retroperitoneal
  • https://www.training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/digestive/regions/intestine.html
  • https://www.cdc.gov/ibd/what-is-IBD.htm

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GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology

What to know about the rectum

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The rectum connects the colon to the anus at the end of the large intestine. It’s the place where a person keeps their stool before excreting it.

The rectum, also known as the intestinum rectum, is a component of the digestive system that sits at the end of the large intestine. It is a connection between the GI tract and the anus. It sits after the sigmoid colon, the last portion of the colon, and is where the body stores excrement before expulsion.

The function and architecture of the rectum, as well as common disorders that may affect it, will be discussed in this article.

What is it?

rectum

The rectum is the last section of the large intestine closest to the anus, according to the National Cancer Institute. The large intestine is around 5 feet long in total, with the rectum accounting for about 12–15 centimeters of that length.

The intestines employ the muscular walls of the sigmoid colon to push excrement into the rectum when the digestive process is completed. The rectum is where the body stores excrement until it is time to defecate. When the rectum is full, stretch receptors in the wall sense it and stimulate the need to pass stool through the anus.

When to consult a doctor

If a person is having rectal discomfort or any other symptoms that could signal a problem around the anal area, they should see a doctor. Any rectal condition can have a negative impact on a person’s quality of life, so it’s preferable to address the issue as soon as possible to minimize problems. If a person is over the age of 50, they should talk to their doctor about having frequent rectal cancer screenings.

Rectal anatomy

Rectal anatomy

The large intestine is divided into four sections:

  • Cecum: Also known as the ileocecal junction, this section joins the small and large intestines. The cecum helps absorb water and any remaining salts during the digestion process.
  • Colon: The colon is the longest portion of the large intestine. It also absorbs water and electrolytes.
  • Rectum: The rectum stores feces until a person is ready to have a bowel movement.
  • Anal canal: The anus is the final portion of the large intestine. It helps a person have bowel movements.

Between the sigmoid part of the colon and the anal canal is where the rectum is located. The sacral and anorectal flexures are two primary flexures, or bends, in the rectum. There are also three lateral flexures, referred to as the Houston valves. These bends help sustain the weight of excrement while also preventing a strong and sudden urge to defecate.

The rectal ampulla, which connects the rectum to the anal canal, is located at the end of the rectum. The ampulla’s function is to act as a brief holding area for feces before it is released through the anal canal. When the ampulla fills up, the intrarectal pressure forces the walls of the anal canal to swell and expand, allowing excrement to enter.

Common rectal conditions

The following are some of the conditions that might affect the rectum:

Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are enlarged veins in the rectum and anus that protrude. They don’t always create symptoms, but when they do, patients may have the following symptoms:

  • discomfort, irritation, or itching in the anal area
  • pain in the anal area
  • sensitive lumps
  • bleeding during defecation
  • protrusion of skin during bowel movements

Infections

A variety of infections can affect the rectum, causing itching, discomfort, and proctitis, among other unpleasant symptoms.

An individual may contract a sexually transmitted infection (STI) after indulging in anal sex, for example. This can include things like:

Antibiotics can sometimes cause a bacterial infection of the rectum. This is due to the fact that antibiotics can kill the good bacteria that keep pathogens like Clostridioides difficile , away. The germs can then grow out of control and invade the rectum.

Infections of the rectum and rectal tissues can also be caused by the fungus. The following are some examples of fungal diseases:

  • histoplasmosis
  • mucormycosis
  • cryptococcosis
  • candidiasis

Parasites can enter the body and cause disease, especially when cleanliness is poor. Protozoa, which are single-celled organisms, and helminths, which are worms, are the two most common parasitic infections in the bowel. Parasites can cause a variety of issues affecting various parts of the gut, including the rectum.

Anal abscess

A collection of pus in the tissue surrounding the anus or rectum is known as an anal abscess. One usually happens after an illness or an obstruction. A perirectal abscess is a type of rectal abscess that affects roughly 68,000–96,000 persons in the United States each year, according to data. A doctor would usually cut and drain the pus-filled cavity as part of the treatment.

Prolapse

Rectal prolapse occurs when a portion or all of the rectal wall passes through the anal sphincter, the seal that keeps the rectal contents contained. The weakening of the muscles that support the rectum is the most common cause of this illness.

Rectal prolapse can be classified into three categories:

  • External: The entire rectum wall protrudes out of the anus, also known as full-thickness or complete prolapse.
  • Mucosal: Only the mucosa, or anus lining, protrudes through the anus.
  • Internal: Also known as an incomplete prolapse, the rectum folds in on itself but does not protrude out through the anus.

Incontinence

The rectum is vital for managing defecation and maintaining continence because it retains excrement. If a person’s rectum suffers from muscle injury, nerve damage, prolapse, or scarring, it’s possible that the rectum is unable to function properly, causing stool to seep from the anus.

Rectal cancer

Rectal cancer is a disease in which cancer cells grow in the rectum’s tissues. Rectal cancer can cause the following symptoms, which are not always present:

  • bright red blood in stool
  • leaks of diarrhea
  • constipation
  • pain
  • changes in bowel habits

Colon and rectal cancers are the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy are all possible treatment options.

Rectal health advice

People can try to practice proper anal hygiene to assist preserve rectal health and prevent rectal disorders. This can involve things like having regular bowel movements and using safer sex. Furthermore, lifestyle adjustments can aid in improving rectal health and lowering the risk of rectal cancer. These can include the following:

  • avoiding alcohol
  • reaching or maintaining a moderate body weight
  • maintaining a nutritious, balanced diet
  • avoiding smoking
  • exercising regularly

Conclusion

The rectum connects the colon to the anus and is the last segment of the large intestine. It’s the place in the body where stool is kept until a person is ready to poop.

The rectal area can be affected by a variety of disorders. By producing pain, discomfort, and incontinence, any of these can lower quality of life. If a person is having problems with their bowels, they should see a doctor for a diagnosis.

Sources:

  • https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/about.html
  • https://fascrs.org/patients/diseases-and-conditions/a-z/abscess-and-fistula-expanded-information
  • https://training.seer.cancer.gov/colorectal/anatomy/
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK507857/
  • https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/rectum
  • https://www.cdc.gov/cdiff/index.html
  • https://www.cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer/causes-risks-prevention/prevention.html
  • https://fascrs.org/patients/diseases-and-conditions
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4442724/
  • https://fascrs.org/patients/diseases-and-conditions/a-z/hemorrhoids
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK537103/
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4211850/
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493202/
  • https://www.cancer.gov/types/colorectal/patient/rectal-treatment-pdq
  • https://medlineplus.gov/rectaldisorders.html
  • https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/rectal-prolapse
  • https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/rectum
  • https://www.training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/digestive/regions/
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK532308/
  • https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/digestive/regions/intestine.html
  • https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/bowel-control-problems-fecal-incontinence/symptoms-causes
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK507895/
  • https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/index.html

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Crohn's / IBD

Is there a link between IBD and microplastics?

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microplastics
A recent study investigates the relationship between microplastics and IBD.

In a recent small-scale investigation, researchers discovered a link between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and higher levels of microplastics in feces. The results were published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

The study, however, does not prove that microplastics cause IBD. More research is needed to confirm the findings and then seek an explanation for the link.

IBD explained

IBD is a broad term that refers to a variety of gastrointestinal disorders marked by inflammation. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are the two most frequent kinds.

Diarrhea, rectal bleeding, weight loss, abdominal pain, and exhaustion are all symptoms of IBD.

Researchers aren’t sure what causes IBD, but they believe it starts when a person who is genetically predisposed to the disease is exposed to a specific trigger. More research is needed to determine how important environmental triggers are.

IBD and microplastics

The researchers wanted to discover if there was a link between microplastics and IBD in this new study. Microplastics are present in people’s bodies throughout their lives, yet the health repercussions are unknown.

“We urgently need to know more about the health consequences of microplastics since they are everywhere—including in our drinking water,” says Dr. Maria Neira, WHO director of Public Health, Environment, and Social Determinants of Health.

“Microplastics in drinking water do not appear to constitute a health danger at current levels, based on the limited knowledge we have.” However, we need to learn more. We must also halt the global surge of plastic pollution.”

The current study’s corresponding author is Dr. Yan Zhang. He works at Nanjing University’s School of Environment’s State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, where he previously discovered that microplastics accumulate in the liver, kidney, and intestine in animal models.

He also discovered that the particle size of the microplastics had a significant impact on the accumulation.

“Compelling evidence suggests that microplastics primarily collect in the guts of many species and induce intestinal inflammation and metabolic disturbance,” the researcher told Medical News Today. “Microplastics will inevitably come into contact with humans.”

“Estimating the exposure levels and loads of microplastics in people is crucial for assessing the health risk of microplastics.” However, accurate evidence on the effects of microplastics on humans is still unavailable. Furthermore, the actual health danger of human exposure to microplastics has long been a source of worry.

Fecal samples

Because microplastics are routinely ingested through the gut, the researchers wanted to see if there was a link between microplastics and IBD.

They did this by examining fecal samples from study participants. The researchers gathered 52 persons with IBD and 50 people who were otherwise healthy but did not have IBD.

The participants answered questions on the foods and beverages they consume, their working and living conditions over the past year, the state of their IBD, and their demographic characteristics on a questionnaire.

The scientists then looked at the feces samples to see how much and what kind of microplastics were present.

Microplastics linked to IBD

They discovered that those with IBD had considerably more microplastic in their stools than those who were healthy.

Further research revealed a link between the severity of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease and the number of microplastics present.

The researchers also discovered that persons who had more microplastic in their stool samples drank more bottled water, ate more takeout food, and were exposed to more dust where they lived or worked.

“For the first time, this study reveals that there is a significant difference in the concentration of microplastics in feces from IBD patients and healthy people. Our study also indicates that the characteristics of fecal microplastics are useful to estimate the gut exposure of microplastics.”

– Dr. Yan Zhang

“It’s difficult to say whether microplastics play a role in the development of IBD because it’s a complex systemic disease with an unknown etiology.” People with IBD are more likely to retain microplastics, we suspect.”

The study had flaws as well, the most significant of which was its small size. Before scientists can reach more solid findings, they must perform much larger investigations.

“The concentration of [microplastics] in feces found in this study cannot directly match the concentration of [microplastics] in the gastrointestinal system or in the human body,” the study authors write.

To put it another way, just though people with IBD excrete more microplastic doesn’t mean they have more microplastic in their bodies.

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